Uzbek traditions and hospitality

Hospitality

characteristics of Uzbek traditions

One of the characteristics of the Uzbek family is hospitality and respect for the elderly person. Uzbek families are usually quite numerous and their members prefer to live in the same house. Hospitality reflects one of the oldest and most national traditions. In the past, the hospitality of Uzbeks and Tajiks was considered a fundamental rule and a moral law. When the pilgrim left his home, he was not so worried about being far from it, because he knew that there was always and everywhere in those places someone willing to welcome him and feed him as a guest. Not providing good hospitality or, worse, doing harm were acts considered to tarnish the family name. In addition to that, respect for an elderly person has always been of enormous value. When they say goodbye, men usually shake hands, while women just put their hands on their chests and greet with their voices. It is considered rude to refuse an invitation to lunch or dinner, as well as to be late. Usually, a guest brings some food to the hosts and some sweets for the children. In the house, the hosts invite guests to take a seat away from the front door, because it serves the host family. After everyone has sat down and a moment of thanks for the host family ends, it can all begin. The hosts invite guests to take a seat away from the front door because it serves the host family. After everyone has sat down and a moment of thanks for the host family ends, it can all begin. The hosts invite guests to take a seat away from the front door because it serves the host family. After everyone has sat down and a moment of thanks for the host family ends, it can all begin.  Each meal begins and ends with tea. Tea is predominant in the culinary culture of Uzbekistan and is offered to guests according to Chinese traditions, with an impeccable and carefully prepared ritual. The host pours small amounts of tea to the guests and when the host runs out, pours it again.

Marriage

Marriage plays an important role in the life of Uzbeks and is one of the traditions most considered by people. The matchmakers, after having reached the agreement, on the appointed day go to the girl’s house to obtain the family’s consent to the marriage (Sindirish, that is: breaking the bread). Only after receiving the consent, it is possible to proceed to the engagement ceremony, during which the boy sends gifts to the girl. It is after the engagement ceremony that the wedding date is set. The wedding day is considered the most beautiful day in the life of an Uzbek and is celebrated with great and joyful participation. The groom arrives at the bride’s house with his friends and family. The bride’s parents dress the groom in a wedding suit and skullcap. Then they leave the house to go to the Municipality where they sign the documents and then they all gather together in the restaurant for the party, which usually starts in the evening. When the couple arrives home, in some parts of Uzbekistan there is a Zoroastrian tradition, whereby the groom picks up his wife and, before going to their room, they walk around the fire three times. The next day takes place the Kelin Salom, the greeting of the bride to the new home. Everyone congratulates her and offers gifts. They circle the fire three times. The next day takes place the Kelin Salom, the greeting of the bride to the new home. Everyone congratulates her and offers gifts. They circle the fire three times. The next day takes place the Kelin Salom, the greeting of the bride to the new home. Everyone congratulates her and offers gifts.

The Pilaf Of The Morning

The custom of the morning pilaf concerns the days of marriage and funeral celebrations (which take place 20 days and one year after the fact). The wedding organizers set the date of the morning pilaf and invite the families of the newlyweds, relatives, and neighbors. The evening before the morning pilaf the wedding planners have to peel the carrots. For this reason, relatives and neighbors are usually invited to lend a hand. The morning pilaf should be ready for the end of the first-morning prayer. The first participants of the morning pilaf should be the people who completed the morning by praying (Bomdod namozi). The sounds of musical instruments herald the start of the party. Guests take their seats and after completing the inaugural ceremonies and prayers they begin to be served. Plates with pilaf are served at each table. After eating, the plates are collected in a dedicated space. This pilaf lasts a maximum of 2 hours. The difference between the morning pilaf for marriage and for a funeral is that the imam, in the second case, recites a prayer and remembers the deceased person.

Birth And Cradle Rite

The cradle rite is a large festival dedicated to the ancient tradition that has existed for a long time and still remains one of the most common in Uzbekistan today. On the fortieth day after the birth of the child, the relatives of the mother bring the cradle (in Uzbek “beshik”) sweets, toys, and everything necessary for the newborn. According to tradition, while the guests have fun and eat in the children’s room, women and the elderly swaddle the baby and put it in the cradle and then gifts are offered to the baby.

Traditional Men’s Clothing

Men’s clothing: The men’s national dress is a padded dress in Uzbek “Chopin”, tied with a handkerchief, the traditional headdress is called “Tubeteika” (a kind of oriental hat). Thin leather boots cover the legs, “Kuylak – Ashton” is the shirt with the straight cut. “Ashton” – are the wide men’s trousers, tight at the bottom. “Chopin“ – is a stuffed caftan. On the sides of the caftan, there are cuts for comfort when walking. Headdresses are called tubelike, kalpon, kallapush.

Traditional Women’s Clothing

The traditional women’s costume is a tunic type dress with a simple cut made of silk and wide trousers, the typical party clothes are made in “atlas” fabric decorated and sewn with gold. The women’s headdress consists of 3 elements: skullcap, handkerchief, and turban. Certainly, for Uzbek women, an indispensable addition to the costume is gold or silver jewelry.  Even the embroideries on clothes have their own magical or practical meaning. In the past, the social status of women could also be understood from the drawing. For example, the prevalence of shades of blue and purple in the female dress indicated the high social position of the husband, instead, the green color was often used by peasants and artisans.

The shoes are called “marks”, a beautiful boot, with a soft, flat sole without heels. They are very comfortable and that is why they are still widely used today.

You may also be interested in 11 wedding traditions in the world that will leave you speechless